Stay One Shot of Flu Season 1
25 flu shot2

If you and your family haven’t gotten your flu shot yet, now is the time. Because the virus changes each year, you must get vaccinated annually to be protected. Influenza symptoms often mimic those of a cold, but unlike a cold, the flu can be extremely dangerous. Typical Influenza symptoms include muscle aches, fever, headache, cough, and lethargy. To protect you and your family even more, Centra Care is now offering quadrivalent vaccines at all of our locations. Quadrivalent or quad vaccines are designed to protect against four different types of flu viruses providing broader protection against the flu.

Why the shot?

This year, the CDC has recommend against using “nasal spray” vaccines as they were shown not to be as effective as the traditional vaccine, especially in children between the ages of 2 and 17 years.

Our $30 flu shots for adults and children, as well as antiviral medication are available at all Centra Care urgent care locations.

PLUS – There’s no out-of-pocket cost to seniors who bring their Primary Medicare card.

Catch Symptoms Early

If you suspect you have the flu, its duration can be shortened considerably with antiviral medicine. Centra Care physicians have the rapid Influenza test at each center.

Practice Flu Prevention

Wash your hands with soap and water frequently. Keep your hands away from your face.

Get Your $30 Flu Shot Now

Once you receive the flu shot, it takes your body about 2 weeks to reach maximum immunity.

Who Should Be Vaccinated?

The CDC recommends that everyone 6 months and older get a flu vaccine each year. It is especially important that certain people get vaccinated either because they are at high risk of having serious flu-related complications (like bronchitis or pneumonia) or because they live with or care for people at high risk for developing flu-related complications. Including:

    • Pregnant women
    • Children younger than 5, but especially younger than 2 years old
    • People 50 years of age and older
    • People of any age with certain chronic medical conditions
    • People who live in nursing homes and other long-term care facilities
    • People who live with or care for those at high risk for complications from flu, including:
    •          – Health care workers
               – Household contacts of persons at high risk for complications from the flu
               – Household contacts and out of home caregivers of children less than 6 months of age (these children are too young to be vaccinated)